Month: December 2015

ROMAN MASK SALE!

A very merry Christmas to you all! I hope readers of this blog all have exciting plans for the Christmas season.  I’ll be spending Christmas day with my family, and then straight after, I plan to travel north, to my cottage in Northumberland.  The reason for this trip is to work on the sequel to my novel Roman Mask.  I’m really excited, and have lots of plans and ideas to develop.  It’s really important for my writing process to get off to a good start. Several days with just me and the (new) dog in the Northumbrian hills is just what is needed to start the long journey. In celebration of Christmas, I have decided to reduce the price of my novel Roman Mask until the December 31st.  After this date, the price will revert back to its normal pricing structure, so get it cheaply now whilst you still can!  Unfortunately this offer only extends to the kindle version as changing the price on the paperback is impossible (without me losing money!) as the margins are so …

The Gladiator!

Ancient Rome’s gladiators have both fascinated and horrified generations of historians in equal measure.  The concept of the gladiator came from the funerals of rich and powerful, where slaves were forced to fight as a funeral gift for the departed shade.  Ambitious politicians, such as Julius Caesar, realised what a powerful tool these fighters could be in gaining popularity from the masses, and the gladiator was born. The Romans loved to match gladiators with different fighting styles against one another, in order to produce the most dramatic and exciting contests.  Therefore there were a number of different types.  Here are ten of them: lottie52occache.wikia.com Thraex “The Thracian” Relatively lightly armoured, the Thraex carried a curved blade, small round or square shield, and helmet.  He was given small leg greaves as well, but the rest of his body was otherwise unarmoured and therefore a tempting target.  The Thracian needed to be light on his feet and be able to rely on his dexterity to survive in the arena. hotdog.hu Murmillo “The Sea Fish”  Often matched against the lightly …

Graham Clews – Eboracum!

It is always nice to meet someone who shares my passion for the ancient world and it is why I am always delighted to showcase other authors work on my site.  Today I am delighted to introduce Graham Clews who made contact with me and told me about his trilogy on Eboracum, set in ancient Roman Britain.  I have attached the description to the first novel of the trilogy, ‘The Village’ and underneath Graham has written a few words about the series, and why he felt impelled to write it. Thomas M D Brooke From the time Cethen Lamh Fadha and his sharp witted wife Elena see a Roman ship slam into their village dock, to the clash of arms that takes place almost two years later as a result, their life is an uprooted trail of turmoil. Led by a Brigante king who, at times, seems to be an affliction that rivals that of the Romans, the couple find their paths reluctantly crossing that of Gaius Sabinuis Trebonius, senior tribune of the Ninth Hispana …

Thinking of writing your first book? This is my writing process.

Recently a friend of mine sent me an email.  She told me how much she used to enjoy writing, but over the years she had let her passion fall away.  She told me that the release of my novel rekindled her desire to write, but was unsure how to start.  She wondered if I could help.  I wasn’t sure if I could, as I have absolutely no idea whether my method of writing could be of any use to anyone other than myself.  But I figured it couldn’t hurt to try, so I sent her a breakdown of the process I use in constructing a novel.  There are no big secrets here, so if anyone else is interested in how I write, this is it.  I must make it clear that different writers, have different methods, and I don’t pretend to have all the answers. This is just the process I use when writing. Please forgive the informal and personal tone of this post, remember, it was written in the form of a letter originally. …

Shades of Time. A new novel by Sandra Dennis

What is it that connects us to the events of the past? We can certainly learn history through literature or other forms of media, but sometimes the connection goes much deeper than this.  This is especially the case if we have a local or family connection to those same events.   Is it through the memories passed down the generations? Or Possibly through items left behind,  such as pieces of jewelry or family heirlooms?  Or maybe it is the land itself which forms an intrinsic bond with those who live in its hills, fields, and forests – a link that remains over the centuries? This is the intriguing subject of the new novel ‘Shades of Time’ by Sandra Dennis.  She has very kindly offered to write a guest post on her novel and why she felt compelled to write it, so I’ll pass you over to her… Thomas M D Brooke   The discovery of an Anglo-Saxon brooch brings forth spirits from the past in search of revenge… I had to write ‘Shades of Time’, there was no getting away from this story which was inspired by …